Looking At Infidelity In A Different Light

Looking At Infidelity In A Different Light.  Rethinking Infidelity.  Is it cheating if you sleep with other people after having a discussion about opening up your marriage?  Is talking to people on the internet or dating sites considered a betrayal?  There are many reasons why men cheat and other reasons why women cheat.  Whatever the reason, affairs are less about physical sex than they are about desire and the need to feel desired.  As a Marriage Counselor and Affair Recovery Specialist, I hear compelling stories about why boundaries were crossed and why indiscretions were made.

In Affair Recovery, there are three options discussed with the couples I work with as I guide them through the crisis phase.

Option 1: Status Quo – Do nothing more than what they have been doing.  Internalizing thoughts and feelings and continue to inappropriately act them out through bad behavior.  Never getting the professional help needed to acquire moving forward skills and manage emotions.

Option 2:  Move Forward – With a therapist who specializes in working with couples in affair recovery.  My couples receive a Moving Forward Plan developed specifically for them as every couple has their own set of unique circumstances where they can understand and gain insight into why the affair happened and what is needed to be able to make an informed decision about whether or not they can stay together.

Option 3:  Move On – Separation or Divorce.  I believe you cannot make an informed decision whether to stay together or leave the relationship without undergoing the Affair Recovery process.  Thereby making moving on premature where you may have regrets if you do so.  Divorce makes no room for repair, resilience, and recovery.

In rethinking infidelity, affairs can be a form of self-discovery, a journey for a new or lost identity and a silverling where couples can develop a newfound relationship filled with content and happiness.  Infidelity is likely to be a symptom of a problem.  Exploring the underlying issues can be an experience for the “cheater” to grow, explore, and transform.

Call me at (858) 735-1139 if you want to talk about rethinking and reframing infidelity.  As awful as an affair can be there can be something positive that comes from it.

 

 

 

 

Why Happily Married Women Cheat

Why Happily Married Women Cheat.  I wrote a blog about why women cheat and thought I’d elaborate more on why some happily married women choose to have extra-marital affairs.  Again there are many reasons why people make the choice to step outside their primary relationship.  As a Marriage Counselor, I talk to many women who make that choice.  There are research materials that indicate various reasons for this choice.  I am sharing a couple of reasons that have proven successful in keeping marriages intact.

In the movie, “The Bridges of Madison County,” it depicts an excellent example of how an affair kept a wife from leaving her marriage and family as the Heroine states if she hadn’t had her affair and the experience she gained from it she couldn’t have stayed on that farm she lived on to continue to lovingly meet the needs of her family.

Most women are socialized to marry, have children, manage the household and work outside the home.  Developing their Primary Relationship is an investment in time, energy, and resources.  Often they love their husbands but perhaps feel in some fundamental way that their emotional, sexual, or psychological needs are not being met inside the marriage.  Albeit not typically exercised or accepted in our Society women are getting these needs met elsewhere. Women are unwilling to abandon the marriages and families they have developed as other aspects of the family are functional, satisfying and happy. They were also unwilling to bear the stigma (although slowly changing in the 21st Century) of a publicly open marriage or to go through the effort of negotiating such a complex arrangement.

These women are turning to infidelity not as a way to blow up a marriage, but as a way to remain in it.  As a Marriage Counselor and Affair Recovery Specialist, I work with women who describe infidelity, not as a transgression but a creative or even subversive act, a protest against an institution they have come to experience as suffocating or oppressive.  I have a client who told me she is much nicer to her husband because she has something special going on (her affair) that is just for her.  She states she is more patient with the family, less resentful, and “less bitchy.”
Some may judge these happily married women who cheat as they claim they like their husband enough, (love them, too), have a shared history with them, have children to raise, developed a life together that for the most part works, have acquired financial resources they don’t want to split up and are friends.  But until any of us have walked in their shoes and feel what they feel to make the choices they have made to manage the ramifications of those choices, I wouldn’t throw the first stone.  Albeit affairs are dishonest because they are hidden behaviors from the primary relationship, the rationale is the positive energy from the affair is keeping that primary relationship intact.  What works for some people don’t necessarily work for others.

In my professional and personal opinion, having a dialogue about possibly opening up your marriage is a much better place to start than to unilaterally make a decision to be open or polyamorous.  Betrayals are not good on the receiving end and I do not recommend anyone having an affair without thoughtful consideration about the consequences.

For more information on open marriages and affairs please contact me at (858) 735-1139.

 

 

Lucid Dreams Can Make Your Day

Lucid Dreams Can Make Your Day.  As a Marriage Counselor, I work with couples who want to enhance their relationship. I utilize many techniques within the field of psychotherapy to do just that.  As every couple is different and has their own unique circumstances for moving forward I add other methods to this process.  Incorporating fantasies or at least having a dialogue about a fantasy can make for very hot sex between you and your partner.lucid dreamsI’m entering my 20th year of marriage.  I completed nine years of my first marriage.  I have been working with couples for over 23 years.  After the honeymoon period, relationships can become routine, and as some of my clients say….boring.  As a married Marriage Counselor I understand relationships and the ebbs and flows we experience throughout the years. Because relationships can become mundane at times it doesn’t mean we stop loving our partners.  Novelty tends to bring about interest and talking about situations that pertain to sex and fantasies is a sure fire way to ignite excitement. We all want to feel excited every now and then.  It’s fun and keeps life interesting.  It fuels us out of bed to go work and want to maintain our responsibilities.

Sharing fantasies is one tool that helps transform sexual relationships.  The feelings that are generated through the discussion about fantasies or in this case dreams are magical.  On 12/4/2017:

lucid dreams

I had the most romantic lucid dream last night.  I was walking around what appeared to be a hotel lobby. Went snooping around several floors not knowing what I’d find.  Ended up seeing a friend who I have a deep crush on who was sleeping in an open area.  He was on his stomach.  He woke up, lifted his head and saw me staring at him.  In my haste, I ran out of the area a little embarrassed and hide by a coffee/snack shop.  He found me rather quickly.  The cashier greeted him and obviously knew him.  Asked him if he needed anything.  As he moved toward me he picked me up in his arms and replied…..”no all I need is Sarah.”  Then we locked eyes and had the most intimate open mouth kiss.

I woke up feeling happy and energized.  I’m not a morning person so I was pretty nice to everyone in the household, including my Silky Terrier….LOL.  That evening I shared my dream with my husband, who is the most understanding man. He smiled and said, “wow, that’s pretty good!” You can imagine what transpired that evening.

The point of the story is in healthy relationships sharing fantasies can generate sexual energy if done in the context of a helpful tool. There is a learning curve to understanding how to do this.  For more information on how please contact me at (858) 735-1139.

 

 

Do You Think You Want An Open Marriage?

Do You Think You Want An Open Marriage?  Some people think open marriages are another form of affairs, infidelity or betrayal, that lead to the demise of the marriage.  Some people believe open marriages can be hurtful and damaging to relationships in general.  Open marriages and polyamory are being talked about more so than ever before as the subject is not so shocking to most as the terms have been normalized by experts in the field and mainstream media.  Monogamy or consensual nonmonogamy is becoming more a topic to discuss among people who are interested in alternatives to traditional lifestyles.

Whether you want a monogamous or nonmonogamous relationship it is important to talk with your partner about your boundaries if you’re considering opening it up.  Not everyone has the same idea of what “open” means.  As a Marriage Counselor, I work with couples who have open relationships and some who don’t.  I am currently working with a couple where the husband is in a polyamorous relationship and his wife is not.  What I mean is, while serial monogamy is popular, lifelong monogamy is obsolete and whether we like it or not, polyamory is catching on.  Author Deborah Anapol gives pertinent information from her book “Love Without Limits.” see blog article https://couplescounselorsandiego.com/relationships/polyamory-monogamy-one/

If you’re ready to explore an open marriage, here are 3 steps author Tammy Nelson (The New Monogamy agreement) suggests be taken before actually following through with the process:

Step one

Talk about what your definition is of open. Is an open marriage just an excuse to have an affair? Do you already have someone that you are interested in and you want to pursue the relationship, but you want permission from your partner?

If that’s the case, then you need to slow down the open relationship conversation and start talking about the affair that is either about to happen or is already going on. An open relationship isn’t about integrating a third party who is going to interfere with your marriage or your monogamy. An open marriage is something that you both agree will enhance your relationship, not hurt your intimate connection.

Step Two

What is your vision of what your open marriage will look like in a year? This is an important conversation for several reasons, it will help you get clear about where this open relationship idea might be going.

You might think, “Oh, we will be done with this little experiment in a year. I just want to try it, I think I can get it out of my system after a month or two, or after we have sex once or twice with other people.” But your partner may think, “I am hoping we will have outside partners that may be living with us and sharing our lives within a year.” When you share these two very different visions, you will soon realize that you have a problem. You will need to look more carefully at your ideas of an open relationship.

Is having an open relationship about finding casual sex and a little swinging on the weekends, or is it more about finding love and a polyamorous relationship where you can expand your emotional connection and integrate other partners as long-term relationships into your lives?

Step Three

Go over the rules. Be clear about what your boundaries are regarding sex, including what you define as safe touch, kissing, whether you agree to intercourse, if it is ok to be in the same room, or if you want to watch your partner be sexual or not, if you need to approve of each other’s outside partners, if there will be contact outside of the date nights, etc.

As a Marriage Counselor, I ask my clients who are considering opening up their marriage if they are able to comfortably talk about everything and anything when it comes to their relationship.   Being able to talk about sex and jealousy is certainly a good start when considering open marriage.  Open marriages survive the same way monogamous marriages do through good communication, love, mutual respect, and consideration.  Whereby in open marriages, the communication needs to be more intentional for obvious reasons.

For more information on initiating a conversation about Open Marriages please contact me at (858) 735-1139.

Are Open Marriages Happier Marriages?

Are Open Marriages Happier Marriages?  There’s an article in the New York Times that share the experiences of nonmonogamous couples and what they say about love and trust http://nyti.ms/2q5fqrA  I found the article very interesting and appreciated both the author’s perspective and the couples’ story about their marriages.  As a Marriage and Family Therapist, I utilize approaches used by author Tammy Nelson and various other Sex Therapists who work with couples who are in nontraditional relationships. The frequency in which I see more nonmonogamous couples whose ideas about fidelity are more open than when I started my practice 25 years ago have substantially increased.  Therefore, I have accommodated my work to help those who are in and want to be in consensual nonmonogamous relationships.

As a Marriage/Couples Counselor, I specialize in Infidelity and Affair Recovery.  I’m working with a particular couple where the wife is the Affair Partner, she cheated on her husband, and the Hurt Partner (the husband), is the one who got cheated on.  Both want to repair and move forward to try and make a better relationship as they have children.  For the most part, their family works nicely together in that they have similar parently styles and manage the household diplomatically.  Of course, there’s more to a relationship than being able to take care of tasks, intimacy is desired.

The wife, in this case, loves her husband but doesn’t believe she is “in love” with him anymore.  Having had the affair she has experienced a “sexual awakening” and her sexual desires have stretched to wanting more than what she was taught growing up.  Throughout the recovery process, she has stated she believes she wants to move forward in a nonmonogamous marriage.  He is still contemplating whether or not he wants this or can even do this.

They ask me if open marriages are happier marriages.  In my personal and professional opinion, I say, “not necessarily happier, as much as they are more functional and durable for the long haul.”  As people are living longer these days relationships can tend to experience ebbs and flows.  Some couples don’t want the option of divorce as their primary relationship works on a lot of levels.  Sometimes the excitement of continued heightened intimacy can wane as being together with the same partner can be familiar and familiarity sometimes brings about a lack of novelty that can diminish sexual excitement. Opening up the marriage to meeting new people, not just for sexual experiences but for emotional and intellectual stimulation can make all the difference in becoming more interested in life again and what life has to offer.  With that feeling the primary relationship can benefit and feel brand new again.  That’s what I believe makes a marriage happier with opening up the relationship.  Why give up on many years of developing a beautiful life together just because the sex component dried up.  Revive it by bringing something new into your lives.

For more information on doing just that please contact me at (858) 735-1139.